Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Honeymoon in Thailand

Honeymoon in Thailand

Thailand is an intriguing contradiction of serene beauty and an exotic city that never 
sleeps. Thailand is stunningly beautiful with its serene and postcard perfect palms and 
beautiful beaches. The capital, Bangkok, is a vibrant city well known for its chaos, 
steamy alleyway massage parlors, street side vendors and endless crowds of people. In 
Bangkok, you can spend your time in heady night markets or take in a kickboxing 
match. Alternatively, you and your beloved can indulge in an afternoon of his-and-hers 
pampering with a Thai massage for two using local tonics and oils at a luxurious seaside 
spa. Bangkok is the ultimate shopper's paradise, with dozens of gift-oriented markets 
ripe for a savvy bargain hunter.

For the newly wed couple looking for a perfect honeymoon, Thailand is just the right 
combination of everything - romance, adventure and a countryside rich in history worthy 
of exploration.

The best time of the year to visit Thailand is between November to February.
Regarding accommodation, typically, hotels in Thailand are one-roomed bungalows, with 
a main house for dining. They range from structures built out of cemented river rocks to 
bamboo frames with woven grass roofs. These cozy guesthouses are comfortable, 
private and impeccably clean. Often situated on either a beach or lake, they are 
unquestionably romantic and the perfect getaway for honeymooners.

Thailand offers a rare opportunity to combine adventure and romance into one all-
encompassing yet inexpensive holiday. For a honeymoon, you couldn't ask for more.
Honeymoon in Bangkok

Bangkok is one of the world's most exciting cities. Visit the magnificent temples, palaces and museums. Cool out in the parks. Savour the lively nightlife. Plunge into the shops. Gorge on the wonderful Thai cuisine. Take a trip down the Chao Phraya River, the enchanting 'River of Kings'. Founded in 1782, Bangkok is a young city that constantly changes, constantly fascinates. The Thais call it Krungthep, the city of angels. Visitors just call it one of the great experiences.

 Bangkok is an intricate puzzle of a place, with layer after iridescent layer of mystery, conundrum, and paradox. Capital of the Kingdom of Thailand, it is an adrenalized metropolis of ten million people, with towering glass and concrete skyscrapers, rooftops bristling with television antennas, and probably the most spectacular traffic jams on earth. And it is a holy city, studded with splendid temples, shrines, and monasteries, haunted and blessed by thousands of gods, ghosts, and angels. Because the city has no real geographical core, no central point a visitor can navigate from, perhaps a good way to explore it is by historical periods. Bangkok is relatively young as Asian cities go-about two centuries old-but its cultural heritage extends back to the founding of the original Thai monarchy in the 13th century, and far beyond that, into the ancient underworld of ritual and myth that lies beneath the surface of everyday life in modern Thailand.

This is a Buddhist nation, but it has delightfully variegated the faith, combining Theravada, the oldest, most traditional school of Buddhism, with Hinduism and native Thai animism. At Bangkok's wats, or temples, you see this vibrant, convoluted spiritual world in all its living glory.
Surrounded by gilded gods, golden spires, and ritual objects of every size and description, the Emerald Buddha looms over the central chamber, seated on his own elaborately tiered gilt mountain, with a delicate spiked parasol of gold above his head. The Buddha's flesh glimmers like moonlight, twinkles like a star in the shadows. There is real magic, real power here that the incredible agglomeration of art and architecture in the rest of the wat somehow misses. Sometimes, less is more.

 Everyone who has spent much time in Bangkok seems to have a favorite Wat Arun has its cool riverside porcelain monuments; Wat Pho, its 145-foot-long Reclining Buddha; Wat Traimit, a 10-foot-high Seated Buddha of solid gold. My favorite is the Wat Saket, situated on the Golden Mount, a century-old concrete mountain that towers 254 feet above the city. That may not sound like much, but on the dead-flat plains of Bangkok-just slightly above sea level-it is something out of a dream, a miniature alp floating on high like a mirage.
 There was a sense of timeless calm within those walls, but there was vitality, too. Most of young monks would leave the temple after about three months and return to the secular world outside. Spending two months-a period describes as blissful-in a monastery, they would get jobs, marry, and raise families. But they would never completely lose the peace, the transcendent wisdom they had found in that magical place.
 The effects of the monastic experience, common to almost all-young Thai men and many young women, are palpable. Thais are tough folk-if you harbor any doubts, just watch a local kick boxing match or check out the paratroops that guard Chitaladda Palace.
Now to Bangkok's earthier, more worldly side. If two terms sum up the Thai attitude to everyday life, they are "Sanook-Have a good time," and "Mai pen rai-Never mind." The city's carefree attitude is manifest in myriad shopping centers, bazaars, hotels, restaurants, nightclubs, massage parlors, and discos.
  Always the unexpected, the revelation, the happy surprise, the pearl in the oyster. Even the city's name. Bangkok means "Village of the Wild Plum", from a small trading settlement on the banks of the Chao Phraya River, long since swallowed up by the mushrooming metropolis. The authentic name, the one Thais use, is Krungthep-"City of Angels." But even that is only an abbreviation of the real name, which is, in fact, in the Guinness Book of World Records as the longest place-name on earth: "Great City of the Angels, Supreme Repository of Divine Jewels, Great Land Unconquerable, Grand and Prominent Realm, Royal and Delightful Capital City, Full of the Nine Noble Gems, Highest Royal Dwelling Place and Grand Palace, Divine Shelter and Living Place of Reincarnated Spirits."

Bangkok Songkran Festival 

April 12-14
The traditional Thai New Year is an occasion for merriment all over the city, but most notably at Sanam Luang, near the Grand Palace, where the revered Phra Phuttha Sihing image is displayed and bathed by devotees. In the Wisutkasat area, a Miss Songkran beauty contest is held and accompanied by merit-making and entertainment. Khao San Road, Bang Lamphu area is also one of the high-spots in the city to experience the water-throwing activities between locals and tourists.
Royal Ploughing Ceremony

An ancient Brahman ritual, conducted at Sanam Luang, in which farmers believe is able to forecast the abundance of the next rice crop. The event is a result of a series of ceremonies that are conducted by Phraya Raek Na, portrayed by a high-ranking official from the Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives who wears colourful traditional costumes. This ceremony was re-introduced in 1960 by H.M. King Bhumibol Adulyadej and is considered the official commencement of the rice-growing season.

Honeymoon in CHIANG MAI

Popularly known as the Rose of the North, Chiang Mai is blessed with stunning natural beauty and unique indigenous cultural identity. Founded by King Mengrai the Great as the capital of the Lanna Thai kingdom by merging the various city-states in the region in 1296. Today Chiang Mai is the economic, communications, cultural and tourism centre of Northern Thailand.
About 700 kilometres from Bangkok, Chiang Mai is situated on the Mae Ping River basin some 310 metres above sea level. Surrounded by high mountain ranges, it covers an area of approximately 20,107 square kilometres. The terrain is mainly jungles and mountains, parts of which are within national parks which are still fertile and verdant with plentiful flora and fauna. There are many sites and locations where tourists prefer to visit to study the lifestyle of the tribal people who live on high hills.

Bo Sang Umbrella Festival is held in January in Bo Sang Handicraft Centre. The festival features paper products, paper parasols in particular, cultural shows, a parade showing traditional ways of life, and several contests.
Flower Festival is held in February. The festival includes ornamental garden flower contests, floral floats parade in the morning and beauty pageants. The parade begins at Chiang Mai Railway Station and passes Nawarat Bridge and ends at Nong Buak Hat Park.

Songkran Festival is held annually from 13 to 15 April. The 13th of April is the Great Songkran day featuring the revered Phra Phutthasihing Buddha image parade around Chiang Mai town for bathing, sand pagoda making, blessing of elders, and water splashing.

Doi Suthep Pilgrimage On the night of Visakha Bucha Day, worshippers gather to light candles and make the 7-kilometre pilgrimage up to the temple on Doi Suthep.

City Pillar Inthakin Festival is held to invoke blessings of peace, happiness and prosperity for the city and its residents. Buddha images are paraded around the city. It is held at Wat Chedi Luang for 7 auspicious days and nights in the 7th lunar month.

Yi Peng Festival is held annually on Loi Krathong day. It is a very interesting event of Chiang Mai. The festival features the release of lanterns into the sky to worship the gods. There are also fireworks, lantern contests, and beauty pageants

Honeymoon in PHUKET

Phuket is Thailand ’s largest island, approximately the size of Singapore. Phuket nestles in balmy Andaman Sea waters on Thailand’s Indian Ocean coastline 862 kilometres south of Bangkok.

Phuket formerly derives its wealth from tin and rubber, and enjoyed a rich and colourful history. The island was on one of the major trading routes between India and China, and was frequently mentioned in foreign trader’s ship logs.

The Portuguese, French, Dutch and English traded with Phuket. Other visitors were less friendly. Phuket’s most famous monument is the memorial statue of the heroines Thao Thepkasattri and Thao Sisunthon, who rallied islanders in 1785 to repel Burmese invaders.

Phuket is blessed with magnificent coves and bays, powdery, palm-fringed white beaches, sparkling island-dotted seas, sincerely hospitable people, superb accommodations and seafood, delightful turn-of-the-century Sino-Portuguese architecture; numerous sporting and leisure opportunities; a lush tropical landscape – all of which combine to create a delightful ambience for truly memorable holidays.

Phuket has two major seasons: the Rains Season from May through October, and the Hot Season from November through April. There are many sunny days throughout the Rains Season: showers customarily last little more than 2 or 3 hours. September is the wettest month. The best months are November through February. Average temperatures range between 22 and 34 degrees Celsius.

Thao Thep Kasattri and Thao Sisunthon Fair is held on March 13 every year to commemorate the two great heroines who rallied the Thalang people to repel Burmese invaders. Many activities and celebrations are organised.

Seafood Festival, held around May yearly, is designed to publicise the delicious seafood of Phuket and attract visitors during the rainy season. Activities include a Marine Tourism Resources Parade, seafood stalls, demonstrations of regional cuisines and cultural shows.

Vegetarian Festival is held on the first day of the 9th lunar month (usually October). Phuket islanders of Chinese ancestry commit themselves to a 9-day vegetarian diet, a form of purification believed to help make the forthcoming year “trouble-free”. The festival is marked by several ascetic displays, including fire-walking and ascending sharp-bladed ladders.

Phuket Travel Fair , held on November 1, was first initiated in 1985 at Patong to welcome in the tourist season and designed to foster co-operation among tourism-related operators both in the private and public sectors. Many colourful and interesting activities are organised, such as merit-making in the morning, water sports contests, a Miss Visitor Contest, among others.

Phuket King ’s Cup Regatta is held in December. The Phuket Yacht Club hosts international yachtsmen, largely from neighbouring countries who compete in the Nai Han Beach area for royal trophies.

Laguna Phuket Triathlon is held in each December. The triathlon (a 1,000-metre swim, a 5-kilometre bike race and a 12-kilometre run) attracts world-class athletes from all over the world.

Tourist Season Opening Festival , starting from November 1, is usually called the Patong Carnival, from the place where celebrations occur. Colourful parades, sports events, and a beauty competition for foreign tourists are major activities.

Turtle Release Fair is held on Songkran, the nationwide Thai water festival, on April 13 which is also National Fisherman’s Day. Baby turtles are released into the sea at various locations.

Chao Le (Sea Gypsy) Boat Floating Festival falls during the middle of the sixth and eleventh lunar months yearly. The sea gypsy villages at Rawai and Sapam hold their ceremonies on the 13th; Ko Si-re celebrates on the 14th; and Laem La (east of the bridge on Phuket’s northerntip) on the 15th. Ceremonies, which centre around the setting adrift of small boats similar to the Thai festival of Loi Krathong, are held at night and their purpose is to drive away evil and bring good luck.

Honeymoon in SURAT THANI

Surat Thani is southern Thailand's largest province, covers some 12,800 square kilometres, and has an extensive coastline lapped by Thai Gulf waters. The provincial capital is 685 kilometres south of Bangkok.

Surat Thani boasts some of Thailand's loveliest islands namely the Penang-sized Ko Samui, Thailand's third largest island, palm-fringed jewel of a sparkling archipelago that includes the stunning 250-square-kilometre Ang Thong Marine National Park.

Surat Thani once formed part, and may have been the centre, of the Mahayana Buddhist Srivijaya Empire which steeped in legend and mystery, dominated the Malay peninsula and much of Java some 1,500 years ago. Srivijaya was best described by the itinerant Chinese monk I Ching after a pilgrimage he made to India during the late 600s. Archaeological discoveries at Chaiya district indicate the former empire's splendour.

Rambutan Fair 

The annual August fair celebrates the delicious fruit, first planted in Surat Thani during 1926. Highlights include floats adorned with rambutans and other fruits, exhibitions of local products and ornamental plants, and demonstrations by specially trained monkeys who harvest coconuts.

Chak Phra Festival 

Surat Thani celebrates the official end of the annual 3-month Buddhist Rains Retreat (Ok Phansa) in mid-October with the Chak Phra Festival (literally 'the procession of hauling the Buddha image’). The tradition stems from the belief that the Buddha ascended to Heaven during Phansa to preach to his mother. The festival marks the Buddha's return to Earth, and is an occasion for religious merit-making and general celebrations. Local people organise dazzling land and waterborne processions of revered Buddha images (to symbolise the Buddha's return to Earth) and boat races on the Tapi River where long boats, manned by up to 50 oarsmen, are ebulliently raced. Religious devotion, spectacle and merriment combine to make Surat Thani's Chak Phra Festival a memorable annual event.

Honeymoon in Pattaya

Pattaya is renowned as one of Thailand’s premier beach resorts and honeymoon destinations – the perfect setting for a romantic getaway or honeymoon holiday.

This once sleepy fishing village offers more than 15km of sandy coastline backed by a huge range of entertainment and accommodation options to suit all tastes.

Things to do and see 
Although well-known for its notorious go-go bars and raucous nightlife, Pattaya also offers couples (and families) a relaxing, fun-filled holiday with a wide range of theme and water parks, cultural attractions and inexpensive land- and water-based activities.

Go windsurfing, waterskiing, jet skiing, parasailing and strap on a mask for a snorkelling or diving trip out to one of the nearby offshore islands. On land, go elephant trekking or tee-off from a choice of several golf courses all located within a 15-minute drive of the town centre.

And if bustling Pattaya is not to your liking then try neighbouring Jomtien, Wong Amat and Naklua beaches – quieter and popular alternatives and long-time favourites of Thai and expat families.

Ankita Mishra [MBA,Marketing+HR]
Marketing Manager
AeroSoft Corp

On Line Assistence  :
Gtalk                    :   Ankita.aerosoft@gmail.com
Y! Messenger             :   Ankita.aerosoft@yahoo.com
Rediff Bol               :   Ankita.aerosoft@rediffmail.com
MSN                      :   Ankita.aerosoft@hotmail.com

Monday, January 2, 2012

Indian Honeymoon, indian honeymoon packages, indian honeymoon spots, indian honeymoon videos, indian ocean honeymoon, indian wedding night, sandals Welcome to the southern part of India

Aerosoft Synopsis

Business name: http://indian-honeymoonpackages.blogspot.com
Address: A# 108 Ambikapuri Extn, AirPort Road
City: Indore
State: Madhya Pradesh
Postal Code / Zip: 452005
Country: India
Email:  Aerosoft.ruchika@rediffmail.com

Gorgeous resorts, Honeymoon in Maldives, underwater restaurants, water bungalows Honeymoon in Maldives

A destination straight out of your dreams, Maldives is where this holiday is going to take you! It is every traveller's delight. Sunny days, soft white sands, turqouise blue waters and tall swaying palms, experience it all staying at the Kurumba Resort, which offers excellent services and facilities to its guests. Swimming, sunbathing, watersports, and a host of recreational activities await you at this Kurumba beach heaven. Get this holiday today!

The Republic of Maldives is a gorgeous patch of nearly 1200 coral islands that makes the Laccadive Sea a heavenly place to be. Coral reef, lagoons and fabulously white beaches make it look like a piece of heaven on earth.

With no care for what is to come, the Maldivians indulge in luxury. Gorgeous resorts with water bungalows and villas, underwater restaurants, and state of the art diving excursions all make it an expensive holiday. While Maldives is one of the best beach and diving destinations in the world, it is not a party town. It is an Islamic country and alcohol is illegal. So are swimsuits. But you can have both only if you are in a resort.

The nightlife is tame but you can make up for it by going shopping. It has some lovely products that you can take back home. The handwoven mats, pretty boxes with lacquer work and dhoni models (traditional boat). If shopping does not do it, go for marine sports like surfing, scuba diving, snorkelling, night fishing, windsurfing and water skiing. 

Honeymoon in Nepal Honeymoon in Nepal

Nepal is better known as the land of colorful cultures, ancient history and wonders of Mother Nature. Nepal is the perfect place to spend your honeymoon. You can scale the heights together in Nepal which is the home to the highest mountains in the world. Every honeymooner is enchanted by this beautiful land and its natural beauty. You can find in abundance wildlife and floral forests, terraced farms carved off the hillside, gushing rivers and waterfalls and the ever-present aura of the majestic Himalayas.

The beautiful Nepal has it all - colorful cultures, ancient history and friendly people, superb scenery and wonders of Mother Nature at its very best. You can browse through the capital city of Kathmandu which is a throbbing Cosmo polis where you can spend many an hour enjoying the rush of adrenalin at one of the famous casinos, browsing through the bazaars and shopping malls, and dining at the amazing eating joints. Alternatively, you can also visit the ancient city of Patan, with its rich cultural legacy; Bhaktapur, the city of devotees; Pokhra, with its gorgeous lake, a take-off point for trekkers, rafters and mountaineers; Chitwan, the wildlife paradise where you can live in the lap of nature or the lap of luxury; Tansen and Gorkha with their panoramic Himalayan views; and Lumbini with its Buddhist heritage. Nepal has a little of everything for that special honeymoon experience.



Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal is also its only international air gateway and major travel center. Tourism is the most important industry that sustains not only Nepal but Kathmandu also. In this regard, one can say that Kathmandu is a tourist friendly travel destination. Kathmandu is not big when one compares it to other cities in South Asia. Kathmandu is a fascinating old city today where pagodas, narrow cobbled lanes, old carved windows, and stone shrines are backdrops to the drama of life that continues unhindered. Here the experiences are amazing, views fascinating, and the climate charming.

Call it magic, call it enchantment, call it a trick of the light, sleight of hand, a celestial conjuror's trick, call it what you will but there is a real Kathmandu and a real Nepal hidden behind the well-trodden snapshot country that is gift wrapped by an anonymous machine and handed out a half-day sightseeing at a time.The hidden Nepal and the secret Kathmandu still await discovery.And they are ours. Here is a country agog with palace squares, towering temples, and with memories of wild dreams. There are cobbled stone streets that wind through ancient bazaars and lead to a sanctified place where a hundred priests on flying white horses once alighted. There are Buddhistst Stupas around which psychics and fourtune tellers abound. There are dawn and dusk places where witch doctors exorcize spirits and remedy all ills.

There are living Goddesses whose smiles are a benediction. There are reincarnate Lamas who forsee the future with a roll of dice and scriptural reference. There are walks that lead the adventurous to legendary places where ogres once lived, where Goddesses danced, and where Gods were held ransom by tantric yogis.

There are hidden gardens behind palaces yet unseen and courtyards where miracles happen, and a city the Buddha visited. There are hillocks where a patron saint of Sikhism lived, and where a pagoda roof was invented. There are courtyards with intricate carvings of stone and there are midnight masked dancers who are possessed by the Gods.


Nepal's culture is greatly influenced by its music, architecture, religion and literature. Your first sight of Nepal may leave you speechless, the great quantities of temples, churches, monasteries and other religious buildings, the hurly-burly in the streets and the number of people and animals socializing on every corner of the narrow cobble-stone lanes.

Nepal is constitutionally a Hindu kingdom with legal provisions of no prejudice against other religions. The Hindu inhabitants in the country has been constantly over 80 percent since the 1950s. The second largest religion of Nepal is Buddhism, it is practiced by about 11 percent, while Islam comprises of about 4.2 percent of the population. The Kirat religion makes up nearly 3.6 percent of the population.

Nepal has many customs and beliefs that might be difficult to understand and not so easy to obey but this is the way of life to them and you should respect it when you are in their territory.

Note that men and woman should always dress appropriately. Men should not walk or trek bare-chested, shorts are acceptable but it's recommended to rather wear long pants. Woman are recommended to wear long skirts that cover the ankles, because exposure of a woman's legs can draw unnecessary attention.

Showing affection between men and woman in public is not acceptable. So avoid kissing, hugging, cuddling or even holding hands in public.


Scores of restaurants and cafes line the lanes of Kathmandu's tourist quarters, and more spring up after each monsoon. Tibetan, Chinese and Indian food have long been taken for granted in Kathmandu, European specialities predominate these days, American-style pies and cakes, though overrated, are ever-popular and even Japanese, Thai and Mexican dishes are available.


Kathmandu is excellent for shopping because of the wide range of handicrafts available at very reasonable prices. Jewelry, off-the-peg clothing, pashminas, decorative metal plates, khukuri knives, rice paper, pottery, tea, woodcarving, thangkas (colorful traditional Tibetan Buddhist paintings of religious subjects) and woolen carpets are ideal souvenirs. Imported luxury items can be found in the shops along New Road and Khicha Pokhari, close to Durbar Square. Durbar Marg is Kathmandu?s most fashionable address with exclusive items for sale. A whole array of spices, dried fruits, pots and textiles can be found in the bazaar between Asan and Indra Chowk. Many visitors will head for Thamel, the tourist district, where bargains can be found in the form of handicrafts, gems, garments and pashminas. A warren of upmarket shops selling clothes, carpets, art and antiques are to be found in the Bahar Mahal Revisited complex, a former Rana palace, near the Singh Durbar government offices in the south east of the city. Shops are generally closed on Saturdays, but those that cater for the tourists stay open seven days a week.


Trekking is a rewarding experience in Nepal. The surroundings are beautiful -- from the subtropical banana trees and rice plantations to the alpine forests with jade rivers and snow-tipped rhododendron flowers. You will encounter singing children and mule caravans walking ancient trade routes and wonder how yaks graze on such steep hills. Wake to the sight of a 25,000-ft peak looming over your doorstep, or round a bend in the trail to suddenly see a spectacular mountain view. These are typical Himalayan experiences you will never forget.


A delightful complex of palaces, courtyards and temples at the heart of the old city, many built between the 12th and 18th centuries and now a World Heritage Site. South of Thamel area.


The old Royal Palace, no longer home to the royal family, with buildings of intricate architecture and ornate courtyards.


The residence of the Living Goddess Kumari, with exquisite carved wooden balconies and window screens, at which she can occasionally be seen.


Buddha?s eyes are painted on all four sides of this 36m (118ft) high stupa, dating back to circa AD600. The religious center for Nepal?s population of Tibetans, this holy site houses hundreds of prayer wheels.


Enjoying a hilltop setting, this lovely Buddhist temple has great views of the city and is home to a boisterous troupe of monkeys.


This is the most important museum in Nepal and houses a collection of ancient artifacts, works of art and weaponry.


Pokhara is situated 200 Kms South West of Kathmandu and is the starting and/or finishing point for some of the popular treks including the Annapurna Circuit and the Jomsom Trek It also offers a number of short treks for those who cannot opt for long and challenging ones. The most popular among them is Sarangkot (1592 m), a former Kaski fort lying atop a hill five km west of the old bazaar. The scenic valley of Pokhara is an enormous sunlit playground covered by green forested hills, waterfalls, and terraced fields. It s three lakes Phew,Begnas and Rupa further enhance the beauty of the valley at 900 m. Pokhara also offers excellent views of Dhaulagiri, Himalchuli, the five peaks of Annapurna and Machapuchare.


Within that small area, however, is the greatest range of altitude to be seen on this earth - starting with the Terai, only 100m or so above sea level, and finishing at the top of Mt. Everest (8848m), the highest point on earth.Often a visitor's overriding goal is to see the mountains, especially Everest and Annapurna. However, to exclude the people, flowers, birds and wildlife from the experience is to miss the essence of the country regions, or natural zones: the plains in the south, four mountain ranges, and the valley lying between them. The lowlands with their fertile soils, and the southern slopes of the mountains with sunny exposures, allow for cultivation and are the main inhabited regions.


Royal Chitwan National Park is located 166 Kms Southwest of Kathmandu, 204 Kms Southeast of Pokhra. The national park is large area of low, heavily forested hills bordering India in the south, a heaven of wildlife including one horned rhino, leopard, varieties of deer, wild boar and around 400 species of birds. The park, formerly a royal hunting reserve covers nearly 400 square miles of dense forest and is home to nearly 60 Bengal Tigers. The area has two distinct seasons - the wet monsoon season ( June through September ) and the dry winter monsoons.The best time to visit the park is March through May.


There are many other examples of the newar craftsmanship architecture and in Bhaktapur : so I won't list all temples, shrines, statues, bahals (monastery courtyards) or residences : any well done guide (such as the Lonely Planet) will do that better than me.


Dhulikhel is a much larger town than Nagarkot and is situated at an altitude of 5,500 Ft above Sea level, 30 Kms east of Kathmandu on the Kodari Highway. It is 90 minutes drive from Kathmandu. The city offers a complete panoramic view of the snow-capped ranges from Karyolung in the east to Himalchuli in the west. The view however is not as good as that from Nagarkot, one can see for 130 miles. It is a magnificent place to spend the night and awaken to the sun rising across the wide Himalayan range. Once an important link in the ancient trade route to Tibet, Dhulikhel has a glorious past that can be witnessed in the lovely building and intricate woodcarving found among the shop loned streets and in the temples. Like Nagarkot, the city offers numerous interesting day hikes. These provide the tourists an opportunity to see the Nepali countryside away from the roads and also giving a taste of trekking. The easiest is the hike to Namobuddha and back.


Across the Bagmati River from Kathmandu is the much quieter area of Patan with its own Durbar Square containing a richly decorated Royal Palace and delightful temples. It is also a famous center for handicrafts with a traditional craftsman?s colony